C.T. Callahan & Three Little Books Co. Present: the Little Voices Diverse Book Box

What is it?

The Little Books Diverse Book Box basically consists of two separate parts: a diverse book box and a diverse short story anthology. Each month, we’ll release a box featuring a diverse novel, a previously unpublished diverse short story, and some bookish goodies. At the end of the year, we’ll compile all of our short story publications as well as a few others into a diverse anthology.

 

How does it work?

Each month, we’ll have a new, diverse novel as the central point of our book boxes. Inspired by these novels, we’ll release themes to help guide authors toward diverse short stories. We’ll accept previously unpublished short stories from around the world, promote them beside already published diverse novels, and eventually compile them all for our anthology. Submissions are paid, and we’ll accept any work so long as it hasn’t been officially published before (blogs don’t count!) so feel free to send us whatever you’ve been working on. While we’ll be giving special priority to stories that fit our monthly theme, we’ll accept any diverse story each month, and even if your story doesn’t win, you’ll still be in the running to be included in the final anthology.

 

Who will we publish?

Anyone! We welcome experienced writers and amateurs alike. Every piece we receive will be answered with a formal acceptance/rejection, and any piece received prior to the 10th of the month will receive feedback and a chance to resubmit.

 

You said paid?

Indeed we did! All winners will be awarded:

  • Publication as a standalone story and in the final anthology
  • A copy of your standalone story
  • Monetary compensation at $.01 USD/word.

Anyone chosen for the final anthology will receive monetary compensation at $.01 USD/word.

 

Where can I submit?

Email us at INQUIRY@THREELITTLEBOOKS.CO with subject line: LITTLE VOICES [CURRENT MONTH] SUBMISSIONS. Ex. “LITTLE VOICES DECEMBER SUBMISSIONS”. Please compile your story into a word document and include a short personal bio. If your story is own voices, please include that too!

 

Is there any way I can help out?

Spread the word! Follow us on social media! Donate here! Anything you can contribute will help us a ton and is greatly appreciated!

 

I’m still a little confused…?

Send any questions to INQUIRY@THREELITTLEBOOKS.CO and we’ll be happy to answer!

Writing Marginalizations: Why “Tan Skin” Isn’t Enough

I’ve been meaning to write series of posts talking about how to write marginalized characters. With everything that’s happened recently, now feels like an excellent time. For anyone wondering what qualifications I have to give you writing advice about marginalized characters, I’m a queer, neurodivergent, non-binary POC finishing off a degree in Creative Writing and working as an editor for two lit mags. My #ownvoices book comes out in a week.

(P.S. I chose the image above because it’s one of the worst/most offensive descriptions of skin tone I’ve ever seen. If you want to start with what you shouldn’t do, see above. The image is from Skin Renews Skincare on Pinterest.)

So, tan skin. I can’t even detail the number of times I’ve heard, “but it says they have tan skin. That means their a POC.” If you’re wondering why this doesn’t make sense, take a second and think about summer and beaches and yacht parties. Really, just think of an basic white movie. Remember all the people talking about how they want to get tan. It’s so wild! It’s almost like “tan” is a super ambiguous, rather subjective word that means different things to different people and can very frequently be used to describe white people!

So, without further ado, here’s a little “How To” when it comes to writing skin-tones for POCs.

Continue reading “Writing Marginalizations: Why “Tan Skin” Isn’t Enough”

Moving Forward

Yesterday. I woke up at about 2:30 am to check the election results. I’d gone to bed the night before knowing very well who would win the election, but even then, I had to know for sure. I had to be completely certain because there was so much hinging on the result. I’d taken three times the dose of melatonin I’d usually take to knock myself out cold, and still I woke up two hours into the night because my anxiety was through the roof.

I barely wrote yesterday. I distanced myself from social media. I skipped class because I couldn’t bare to be face-to-face with a professor who’d so casually dismissed a Klan member’s racism some classes before. I’ve avoided using “certain names” in my posts because I just got over a bout of trolls and am not in the mood to do it again.

But in all of this, I think the thing I hated the most was the sudden, desperate need to end it all. I haven’t had the urge in a while, and definitely not like this, but it was there because for the first time since I left home, I honestly couldn’t see an out. This was it. It was over.

Continue reading “Moving Forward”