The Weight of Feathers Book Review

For twenty years, the Palomas and the Corbeaus have been rivals and enemies, locked in an escalating feud for over a generation. Both families make their living as traveling performers in competing shows—the Palomas swimming in mermaid exhibitions, the Corbeaus, former tightrope walkers, performing in the tallest trees they can find.

Lace Paloma may be new to her family’s show, but she knows as well as anyone that the Corbeaus are pure magia negra, black magic from the devil himself. Simply touching one could mean death, and she’s been taught from birth to keep away. But when disaster strikes the small town where both families are performing, it’s a Corbeau boy, Cluck, who saves Lace’s life. And his touch immerses her in the world of the Corbeaus, where falling for him could turn his own family against him, and one misstep can be just as dangerous on the ground as it is in the trees.

CW: child abuse, domestic violence, fatmisia, g*psy slur, racism, rape mention, miscarriage

Rating: ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

Short Review: The Weight of Feathers is a magical realism story about love and self-discovery. I want to emphasize here magical realism, and I don’t mean the sort that publishing has been pushing (i.e. The Raven Cycle), but real, true cultural magical realism. If you’ve never read a magical realism story before, you’re in for a ride, and I’d highly recommend this read to you, but keep in mind that it won’t be what you’re used to.

Long Review: Warning – May Contain Spoilers

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They Both Die at the End Book Review

On September 5, a little after midnight, Death-Cast calls Mateo Torrez and Rufus Emeterio to give them some bad news: They’re going to die today. Mateo and Rufus are total strangers, but, for different reasons, they’re both looking to make a new friend on their End Day. The good news: There’s an app for that. It’s called the Last Friend, and through it, Rufus and Mateo are about to meet up for one last great adventure and to live a lifetime in a single day.

CW: ableism, suicidal ideation, descriptions of death

Rating: ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️1/2

Short Review: This book was spawned from Satan’s armpit. Honestly, though, it’s a wild ride of a book with great character development, an awesome theme, and as many light-hearted moments as tragic moments. I’d recommend this book to anyone.

Long Review: Warning – May Contain Spoilers

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